Form Drills

FormDrills

Form drills are a great way to keep your form in check and keep you healthy. You can make the time to workout, make the time to keep injuries at bay. There is a great list of drills and how tos here: http://trackstarusa.com/best-running-form-drills/ and here: http://www.byrn.org/gtips/rundrill.htm

Adding to Tradition

TTrotBlogAh, November. For runners, that means two things: the colder, winter, weather has finally set in, and the abundance of those time honored Turkey Trots! While the colder weather might not be something to look forward to, Turkey Trots are an awesome excuse to get out around the holidays and have a good time.

If you look around, Turkey Trots are everywhere. Peppered through out the month of November a good number of them are on Thanksgiving morning, but there are still some on the weekends before and after. Most are fairly low key, family friendly events. (And some are even canine friendly!)

We all have some sort of Thanksgiving tradition, be it a football game in the backyard or on the television, dinner at the grandparents, pumpkin pie, goose, or some other random event. This year, think about adding to the season’s festivities. Take a look at the calender and get your family and friends involved.

Some Vermont and New Hampshire Trots (Fairly certain it’s complete):

Nov 14 – Middlebury Turkey Trot and Gobble Wobble, 5k/10k, Middlebury, VT
Nov 15 – Feed the Need Predict Your Time 5k Turkey Trot, Stratham, NH
Nov 15 – Charlestown Turkey Strut 5k+Chili Cook off, Charlestown, NH
Nov 22 – Fair Haven Union High School Turkey Trot, Fair Haven, VT
Nov 22 – Milford Turkey Chase, Milford, NH
Nov 22 – Plymouth Turkey Trot, Plymouth, NH
Nov 22 – Turkey Trot 5k, Wolfeboro, NH
Nov 23 – Hanover Turkey Trot, Hanover, NH
Nov 23 – Castleton’s Mens XC Turkey Trot, 1mi, 5k, 15k, Castleton, VT
Nov 27 – The Edge Fitness Center 5-K9 Turkey Trot, Brownsville, VT
Nov 27 – Zack’s Place Turkey Trot, Woodstock, VT
Nov 27 – Gobble Gobble Wobble 5K, Stratton, VT
Nov 27 – Jarred Williams Turkey Trot 10k/5k, Richmond, VT
Nov 27 – Running of the Turkeys, Arlington, VT
Nov 27 – GMAA Turkey Trot 5k, Burlington, VT
Nov 27 – Edgar May Thanksgiving Day 5k, Springfield, VT
Nov 27 – Killington 5k Turkey Trot, Killington, VT
Nov 27 – Bow Police Association Turkey Trot 5k, Bow, NH
Nov 27 – Dover Turkey Trot 5k, Dover, NH
Nov 27 – Fisher Cats Thanksgiving Day 5k, Manchester, NH
Nov 27 – GDTC Turkey Trot Road Race 5k, Derry, NH
Nov 27 – Gilford Youth Center Turkey Trot 5k, Gilford, NH
Nov 27 – Great Gobbler Thanksgiving 5k, Nashua, NH
Nov 27 – Lake Sunnapee Turkey Trot, Sunnapee, NH
Nov 27 – Purity Spring Thanksgiving Day 5k, Madison, NH
Nov 27 – Merrimack Rotary Turkey Trot, Merrimack, NH
Nov 27 – Portsmouth Seacoast Rotary’s 5K Turkey Trot, Portsmouth, NH
Nov 27 – Rochester Runners Free Fall 5K, Rochester, NH
Nov 27 – Severance Wilderness 3 Mile Trail Run, Whitefield, NH
Nov 27 – Turkey Trot 5K, Northwood, NH
Nov 27 – Windham Turkey Trot, Windham, NH
Nov 28 – Strafford Nordic Center Turkey Trot, Strafford, VT
Nov 29 – Okemo Trot it Off 5K, Okemo, VT
Nov 30 – Louise Roomet Turkey Lane Turkey Trot, Hinesburg, VT

The Most Forgotten Season

When I started running, I ran three seasons: cross country, indoor track, and outdoor track. For much of the year, one season bled into another. Outdoor started as soon as indoor ended, and cross country ended after indoor started. I remember trying to convince our coach to let us take a week off, but we never did. We kept running, from August to the beginning of June. Sure there were periods of higher intensity, higher volume miles, but time off didn’t really exist.

Often times I’ll hear someone speaking of burn out. Of pushing too hard for too long and not being able to go any more. (Geoff Roes is a perfect example.) Most of the time, for the purely recreational runner, true burn out isn’t something we’re faced with, but there will be races that we fail miserably. We’ll look back at the miles we’ve put up for a year or two, the miles and hours we’ve logged and we won’t be able to figure out what the hiccup is about, and more often than not, we can’t figure it out.

The difference: The Off-Season. In high school and college, there is a sort of built in off-season. When outdoor track was over, school was essentially over and the summer began. We were supposed to run, and we did from time to time, but it came in floes, and more often than not, our attentions were turned to other thigns: frisbee, soccer, hiking, camping. What we didn’t realize at that time was that the summer provided a much needed off-season. It was a time when our bodies could take a break from the grinding workouts. Our muscles could relax and do something different. Even our minds needed it.

Unfortunately, as an adult, the world is a little different. There is no built in off-season to go relax and play frisbee for three hours with your friends, or take a week and go hike a bunch of mountains. Life brings with it many obligations, and it seems like many runners forget about the obligation to themselves to take time away. We go from one race to the next, one plan to the next. Fall races lead into a Christmas or New Years races, and before we know it we’re training for our first spring race.

It’s also important to understand that “off-season” doesn’t simply mean “go sit on your couch, eat cheese balls, drink beer, and watch the game on the TV.” That would be detrimental. Instead use the off-season to work on different aspects of your running. Cut down on volume, and lower the intensity of your workouts. Do 75% of your miles slower than your easy pace. Go out of your way not to push. Keep your muscles loose and in shape, but don’t kill them, let them recover. Do some form drills, do some mini-circuits. But force yourself to go easy.

Every runner needs an off-season. Some more frequently than others, but the key to a long and healthy running career is in those easy off-season miles. I promise.

Dark Side of the Moon

If you are a committed runner, triathlete or any athlete for that matter you know what a day off feels like. Then there is the second day, third and fourth day off. Those days are hard to deal with. Maybe something came up at work, or home or you got sick and needed to take a few days off, no matter the reason looking back at the training log and seeing empty spots stacked up on empty slots is painful. We all go through it and how we deal with it affects our subsequent training and races.

In the last two months I was diagnosed as anemic, got a sinus infection and prescribed antibiotics that destroyed me and my training, found a lump in my neck, had to get a series of tests done and now am waiting to have it surgically removed. As a result my training as been spotty (and that is generous). I had to bail out of running a marathon and several shorter races that I had planned on running. The last two months have been incredibly hard to take.

What works best for me is to find something else to focus on. That is actually how I got started in triathlons. I was suffering from recurring injury from running and had to find something else to keep me active and training. It can be anything you want and find satisfying. An athlete I work with has had multiple stress fractures in her hip so she cant run as much as she wants to so she has found different video workouts to follow that enable her to maintain strength and cardio with lower miles. As a result she recently ran her fastest 5k since high School (12 years ago).

Don’t dwell on the fact that you cant run. Use it as an opportunity to try new things and experiment you may end up stronger and faster than you were before. You can even plug new things into your training log so you wont have to stare at blank spots any more.

The Common Thread to Running Success

If you’ve ever gone to the grocery store without a list while you’re, you know how crazy and chaotic it can be. In the store you’ll be going up and down each aisle, carefully looking at everything on the shelves, running a mental checklist of sorts. Some aisles, you might even have to come back to. And when you come home you will immediately realize you forgot to buy laundry detergent, or now you have three quarts of yogurt instead of just two. You’ll end up buying junk you don’t need, but looked yummy on the shelf. If you really want to be efficient and get the most out of your trip to the market so you’re not wasting time and gas to make another trip just a couple of days later, you’ll probably make a list.

So is it a list that can help make us succesful runners? Sort of, not exactly. I’m willing to guess that 99% of the time any given runner will have a given goal. It could be a race goal, a mileage goal, whatever kind of goal. We runners set these little carrots out to help give us motivation while at the same time directing our efforts. So while our goals may not be the same, we all have them.

The trick is to know what goals are really important, which ones can be missed without too much worry, and how to set them realistically. Individually, it can be difficult to have the foresight to recognize and set longterm goals: yearly mileage, a 5-year marathon time goal, a rehab goal. We can think about them, and we may even set them, but working towards them can get lost in the shuffle and the completion of immediate goals that at the time seem much more rewarding. Having a third-party work through goals can help steer an athlete in the right direction and keep things on track. To the runner, it might seem more important to run their first sub-4 marathon despite running through injury. A good coach would see it in a different light and instead focus in on a 5-year goal of a sub-3:30 marathon.

Further, it is important to set realistic goals while at the same time, not setting goals that are sub-par. When I set out to make goals for a given race or a week or month of training, I give three different goals: an ‘A’ goal, a ‘B’ goal, and a ‘C’ goal. A ‘C’ goal is pretty low-end. It’s kind of a safety net. Not everyday goes according to plan, and sometimes, they go abysmally awful. A ‘C’ goal is one that would most likely be achieved even on one of your awful days. It allows an athlete to look back at their race, week, month, year, and come away with some sense of accomplishment. A ‘B’ goal is the most realistic goal. It takes into account little hiccups during training and race day. It leaves some room for error, it is achievable but still requires 100% of your effort. Finally, an ‘A’ goal is one of those goals that you can achieve, but don’t expect them to happen all the time. We all have breakout races, but not every race can be a breakout. ‘A’ goals require all systems healthy and working together, plus a little bit of luck.

It is important – and this is why having a third-party involved – that goals are achievable, but not too easy. If we set our goals too high, even our ‘C’ goals, get ready for some disappointment. Too much disappointment and it becomes all too easy to lose sight of what’s important and suddenly running has lost its joy. It’s also important not to set our goals too low. In part because constantly achieving your goals can also get boring, but because if we don’t fully challenge ourselves, we won’t fully succeed.

Goals can be anything. They don’t always have to revolve around time or miles. They can be measured by time, or heart rate, injuries, types of workouts. Maybe it’s devoting one workout a week to hills. Or forcing yourself onto the track once a month. All athletes are different and all of our goals will be different. The important part is to set them, and make them realistic while at the same time challenging ourselves. So get out your log book, and jot down some of your goals. Make a list and keep it handy; work with your coach and have them help keep you accountable.

Asking Questions

Whether you are a self coached athlete or an athlete that is working with a coach who is customizing your training plan leading up to your next big race it all begins with asking a series of questions. Much like composing an essay you have to define certain aspects of your training before you begin or you will most likely find yourself way off track somewhere along the lines.

Even if I have been working with an athlete for a period of time before writing a new plan for them I take the time to sit down with them and ask them several key questions to help define the training and racing seasons. First I ask them their goals, basically what do you want to achieve as a result of training this season? Some might list new pr’s or achieving a top 10 performance at a key race. We then discuss training times and where key races land in the season and how to train to maximize results on that particular day.

This kind of leads into the next question, where do you see yourself and your running in the next 1 year, the next 3 years and the next 5 years.  This is hard for more people than you might think, developing a 5 year plan is a lot to ask especially when injuries and life obligations tend to spring up and set you back a few months at a time. But at the same time it is important to lay out these long term ambitions so that from day to day and month to month you have an idea of where you are headed. This plan can be revisited often so that if an injury does set you back you can readjust, or if you achieve something sooner than expected you can set new goals to pull you further forward.

If I have a new runner I might ask them to define themselves and who they are. This might sound like a hokey kinda thing but it is interesting to see how people label themselves. It also helps to see what people value in themselves and in their lives. For example if I were to answer that question and I said I am a runner who enjoys running 5k’s and 10k’s you get a sense that I value running and I enjoy shorter distance races that are faster paced. If I said I am a teacher who enjoys going for a run after work as stress relief, it paints a new picture. Finally if I were to say I am a committed runner who dabbles in triathlon and wants to complete my first Ironman as a coach I might see that as a clue that this individual might need to work on their swim and bike in order to complete that Ironman triathlon. It is all about reading into peoples answers.

So far we have touched on many of the basics, who, what, where and when. The why is incredibly hard to answer and I have watched it stump a great number of athletes. Why do you run? Why do you want to finish an Ironman? Why do you want to run 100 miles? Even as a seasoned athlete sometimes I find it hard to answer the why question myself, and often the dialogue goes as follows.

  • Why do you run?-It is fun and I enjoy competition
  • Why do you find it fun and why do you enjoy competition?-It is good stress relief and I like the process of training and seeing how fast I can get and to see my improvements.
  • Why do you want to be fast?- Because I love crushing mile after mile and that feeling of satisfaction at the end of a race, and I want to finally break through that 16:00 barrier that I missed in high school by 3 seconds.
  • Why do you think you missed by only 3 seconds? Because sub 16 seemed like a big deal and deep down I thought that was for super fast people.

Now I know that this athlete probably needs to do some mental training to go along  with his physical training simply by asking why again and again.

The how portion of all of this comes down to the coach and the plan. How do we achieve those goals laid out in the interview process. Not every plan works and fits well with every individual. For example you might have a friend who ran a marathon pr with a certain plan. So you follow the same plan and actually run slower. why is this? well each person has a unique muscle structure and system that adapts to stresses differently.

Also blindly laying out a training plan for 24 weeks isn’t always the best plan. The best advice I think I ever got was to write your plan in pencil. This way if something comes up you can adjust. Or if you are having a killer mile repeat workout and you tack on 3 x mile extra you can, and also if you are having the worst workout of your life (we all know it happens) you can cut it off and readjust. Adapt your training plan to you and how your body is coping with the training regiment.

These are simple little ideas and practices that can be used by a self coached athlete and most certainly should be used by a coach. Coaching is all about problem solving, the athlete wants to achieve a certain level and the coach has to problem solve to get them there and without all of the information the trip can be a lot longer and harder than if you took the time to ask a few simple questions.

Good luck this racing season, check out or coaching packages and start working toward your next big pr today.

Coaching Options

Something of a repost (it’s a page on the top bar now), but figured I’d make it a post as well.

In an attempt to accommodate the many different needs and wants of athletes, we have devised a number of different levels. The levels do not pertain to the seriousness of Dead Skunk Racing or the athlete, but rather to the amount of involvment from DSR coaches. We believe we have covered most options; however, if there is a different manner in which you feel we could better suit your needs, please do not hesitate to email us: deadskunkracing2011@gmail.com.

Coaching at levels one and two offer eighteen week training plans, while three and four give you a twenty-four week option. Level five and six offer monthly plans with level six offerning in person contact. At level three, athletes are offered Dead Skunk Racing singlets, and at level four athletes gain access to discounts from our sponsors. You can also purchase DSR swag in our DSR store.

Level One
Level one is an eighteen week written plan. We will write you a customized plan to get you from where you are to where you want to be (as much as is feasible) on race day. Use this plan if you want a training plan to get in great race shape but don’t want the commitment of a coach or want to answer only to yourself. $50

Level 2
Level two is also an eighteen week training plan but you we will talk with you and modify your plan at four week intervals – 4, 8, 12, 16. This is a great opportunity to get a feel for what it is to train with the aid of a coach and to further improve your training and bring it to the next level. $170

Level 3
Level three moves from an eighteen week plan to a twenty-four week plan. We will also provide contact bi-weekly. It is a great plan to get you geared up for your first marathon or if you are working towards achieving a new goal at a key race. Level three atheletes will also receive a DSR racing singlet. $200

Level 4
Coaching at level four is also a twenty-four week plan, but athletes have have weekly contact with DSR coaches via phone, text and e-mail. Athletes will also receive a DSR racing singlet and DSR hat from HeadSweats. You will also recieve a 10% discount on all orders from our sponsors – including SKORA Running, Orange Mud, and Skout Organic. $270

Level 5
Level five coaching breaks things down into monthly periods. You will have constant contact with DSR coaches via phone, text and e-mail. We will work with you to develop and adjust your training to fit your schedule and whatever else life throws at you. This is a great plan if you have long range goals that you are willing to work towards, but need the guidance of a committed coach. You will receive a DSR racing singlet, and hat as well as the same sponsor discounts found in our level four coaching package. $50/month

Level 6
While level six is not for everyone, we are here to offer you in person training and discussion. Rates are on a monthly basis, but one of our DSR coaches can watch your race or work with you once a month during a training session so that you can maximise your time training and make your training more personable. $75/month